Jacob Wright ’23 is a Brockman Scholar from the small border town of Eagle Pass, Texas, who has a heart to change the world and the mind to make it happen. 

WHAT ARE YOU STUDYING?

I am majoring in biomedical sciences with an intent to become an orthopedic surgeon. 

WHAT INSPIRED YOUR INTEREST IN ORTHOPEDICS?

My grandpa broke his collarbone several years ago, and I went to the orthopedic surgeon with him. The doctor said there were two surgeries: one with a quick recovery time but less use of his arm, and another full-on surgery with a long recovery time. The longer surgery would help, but my grandpa’s age made it risky because of possible heart complications. Fortunately, the doctor combined surgeries to one that helped my grandpa and removed the risk. I admired the way he improvised, because I like the idea of finding solutions to help return people to doing what they love.

HOW HAS THE BROCKMAN SCHOLARSHIP IMPACTED YOUR LIFE, AND HOW DO YOU EXPECT IT TO SHAPE YOUR FUTURE?

The scholarship itself has changed life for me and my family. I also know it will help with medical school connections and research opportunities through the Brockman Foundation. I had dreams of attending college and becoming an orthopedic surgeon before I even knew about this scholarship. In addition to financial support, the Brockman Foundation has helped me set the framework to succeed, making my existing dreams more attainable.  

Athlete you’d like to meet in person:

Tim Tebow (even though he didn’t play for Texas A&M), because I loved watching him leave everything on the field. He also founded many charitable organizations after NFL retirement.

Favorite charity:

We have an organization in my hometown called FUN—Friends United Now—that holds parties for special needs children. We would dance with them, and it was always a lot of fun.

Thoughts on Fish Camp:

Fish Camp introduced me to what it really means to be an Aggie and helped me learn the traditions. Meeting my future classmates excited me about spending the next four years of my life with these amazing people.

Best on-campus dining:

Creekside Market in the White Creek Community Center on West Campus. They have different homestyle meals every day with a meat and two sides.

WHAT HELPED YOU PREPARE FOR SUCCESS AT TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY? 

My grandpa took care of me growing up, but when he was diagnosed with early onset dementia in my sophomore year of high school, our relationship transitioned to me caring for him. During my junior year, my mom was diagnosed with breast cancer and moved to The Woodlands for treatments. My dad commuted a lot from our hometown in Eagle Pass, Texas, to support her, so I cared for my grandpa and younger sister while taking AP classes and being involved in extracurricular activities. My mom would call to check on me, but there was only so much she could do. This really helped me learn to be disciplined, self-motivated and manage my time. I also realized I was setting an example for my younger sister.  

WHY ARE YOU FOND OF CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS?

I grew up with a lot of friends in low-income housing, and my church held charitable events for the less fortunate. I also worked as a community pool lifeguard and got to know the kids who swam regularly. When I asked where they’d been after missing some days, they told me their family was having financial trouble. The daily pool entrance fee was only $2. Situations like that make you realize how tough some people have it. I’d like to create an organization to give children from low-income families more opportunities and a better life the way I have been blessed by the Brockman Foundation.    

BROCKMAN SCHOLARSHIP SUPPORTS TOMORROW’S STEM LEADERS

The Brockman Scholars Program, established in 2018 by the Brockman Foundation, supports 50 students annually who are pursuing careers in the areas of science, technology, engineering or math (STEM). The Brockman Scholarship covers full tuition and fees, room and board, books, transportation, and miscellaneous fees while also funding a study abroad opportunity and leadership development programs. Brockman Scholars are expected to complete an internship, and graduate in five years with an undergraduate STEM degree as well as a Master of Science in Business.

Scholars are educated in a dynamic setting that provides hands-on training in both fields of study, combining the two to give students an edge above their peers when entering the workforce. Through their master’s program at Mays Business School, scholars gain a deeper insight into the working application of a STEM degree through courses covering business communications and ethics, finance and accounting, marketing, management, and entrepreneurship.

Applicants selected from the competitive application and interview process are required to maintain a STEM major, earn a 3.5 GPA each semester, attend enrichment workshops co-hosted by the Brockman Foundation and the Texas A&M Foundation, and are encouraged to get involved on campus. Applicants of high academic achievement are given primary consideration, but the selection process also considers qualities of character and good citizenship. The program seeks students with exceptional potential for impacting the world in their chosen professions.

The Brockman Foundation has supported worthy initiatives in the areas of education and medical research for more than three decades. Its philanthropic activities are effected by distributions from a trust established by the late A. Eugene Brockman. A businessman and philanthropist, Mr. Brockman believed strongly that gifted individuals could help create a better world for us all.

The Brockman Foundation is currently accepting scholarship applications for study beginning in the 2020-21 academic year (deadline December 1, 2019). Learn more about the application process.

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